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Twin Cities Mom Collective

8 Common Questions New Parents Have About Their Baby’s Teeth

Many new parents often have questions and concerns regarding their baby’s teeth. With little to no prior experience in tooth care and brushing for babies, it is natural for parents to seek guidance from their child’s dentist. This FAQ written by the experts at Dentistry for Children & Adolescents provides the necessary information to understand your role in caring for your baby’s teeth.

 

When Will My Child Get Their First Teeth?

 Baby teeth typically emerge between the ages of six and nine months. You will likely notice signs of teething when your child becomes irritable, runs a fever, rubs their cheek, or excessively drools. Keep a close eye on these symptoms, and do not hesitate to contact your baby’s dentist or physician if you have any concerns.

When Should My Child See the Dentist? 

Schedule your child’s first dental visit when their first teeth begin to emerge or when they reach one year of age, whichever comes first. It is advisable to seek a dentist who specializes in pediatric dentistry to ensure the best experience for your child. Pediatric dentists have additional education, training, and expertise in working with children and employing techniques to make them feel comfortable during dental visits.

When Should I Start Brushing My Baby’s Teeth? 

Initiate tooth brushing as soon as your baby’s first tooth appears. Choose toothpaste your baby’s dentist recommends, and remember to brush gently. Aim for twice-daily brushing sessions.

Is It True Nursing Causes Tooth Decay? 

While breast milk benefits your baby’s overall health, it contains some sugar that can contribute to tooth decay. Baby formula also contains sugar. To safeguard your baby’s teeth, brush them twice daily and follow the advice mentioned in the previous sections. Remember that breast milk and formula are not the only culprits for cavity-causing drinks. Juices and sodas often contain high sugar levels, which can lead to tooth decay. Please consult your child’s pediatrician before introducing juice or soda and limit their consumption to preserve your child’s dental health.

Why Are My Child’s Baby Teeth Spaced Apart? 

It is usual for baby teeth to have gaps between them when they first emerge. As more teeth come in, these spaces usually fill up. However, if you notice unusually wide gaps between your child’s teeth, it is essential to have your baby’s dentist monitor the situation and provide recommendations to address any potential issues. Regular and early dental visits are crucial in identifying and managing such concerns.

What Are the Signs of Dental Problems in Babies? 

Occasionally, a drop or two of blood may appear during your baby’s teething process. However, if you observe significant bleeding, you should make an appointment with the

dentist as soon as possible. While a mild fever can be expected during teething, consult your child’s physician to ensure everything is in order.

When Should I Start Flossing My Little One’s Teeth? 

Begin flossing as soon as your child’s teeth start touching each other. Flossing in a baby’s mouth can be challenging, so it is best to consult your child’s dentist to learn the most effective and comfortable techniques for flossing.

Does My Baby Need to Take Fluoride Supplements? 

Fluoride, in appropriate quantities, helps prevent tooth decay. If your water supply in Minnesota is from the municipal system, your child will receive the recommended fluoride intake as it is fluoridated at 0.7 mg/L. However, if you use well water, consult your child’s dentist about the appropriate age for fluoride supplements.

Contact your Child’s Dentist Today:

Caring for a new baby can be stressful, especially if you feel uncertain about their dental care. Dentistry for Children & Adolescents is happy to answer all your questions about your baby’s teeth and dental care.  Contact them today to make an appointment for your new baby.

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